UN Security Council strongly condemns Mali coup attempt

The UN Security Council has strongly condemned the coup attempt in Mali which led to the arrest of the African country’s President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, Prime Minister Boubou Cisse and several other members of the government.

In a press statement on Wednesday, the Council members urged the safe and immediate release of all those who have been arrested, reports Xinhua news agency.

They also underlined the urgent need to restore rule of law and to move towards the return to the constitutional order.

They reiterated their strong support to the Economic Community of West African States’ (ECOWAS) initiatives and mediation efforts in Mali and expressed their support to the two ECOWAS communiques, as well as to the one from the African Union chairperson.

They called on all Malian stakeholders to show restraint and give priority to dialogue to resolve the crisis in their country.

The Council members reiterated their support to the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali in its efforts to stabilize the situation in the country.

They also expressed their determination to continue monitoring the situation.

Tuesday’s mutiny was led by Col Malick Diaw – deputy head of the Kati camp – and another commander, Gen Sadio Camara, the BBC said in a report.

After taking over the camp, about 15 km from capital Bamako, the mutineers marched on the city, where they were cheered by crowds who had gathered to demand the President’s resignation.

Later in the day, they stormed his residence and arrested Keita and Cisse, who were both there.

The President’s son, the Speaker of the National Assembly, the foreign and finance ministers were reported to be among the other officials detained.

The number soldiers taking part in the mutiny is unclear, as are their demands.

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