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Netflix Working on Gamertags

Netflix is testing a social experience within its games as it pushes Gamertag-style handles that users can build and publicly display when playing its selection of mobile games, as first spotted by mobile creator Steve Moser.

It should let members identify and invite other users to play games based on their handles and see where they rate on leaderboards.

After updating your Netflix app and downloading Into the Breach and Mahjong Solitaire, you have to encounter the feature for yourself. Netflix permitted you to create and manage the game handle associated with your respective Netflix profile in both games.

Just like making your Gamertag (or public-facing username on any other gaming platform), your game handle must be unique, which Netflix will automatically check once you input the name of your choice.

“Your game handle is a unique public name for playing games on Netflix,” the in-app text reads when first creating your handle. “Your profile icon and name won’t be visible to others. You can change your game handle at any time.”

After tapping into the “Learn More” menu, Netflix explains that you can use game handles when inviting and playing with other members. It will also “guide you where you are on leaderboards” and indicates that you’ll be able to check when specific users are online or offline, creating a sort of social experience within its games. However, when you played around with the new feature, you didn’t see any options to invite friends or view leaderboards, so this may not be available.

Netflix started rolling out game handles in select titles last month, including Into the Breach, Bowling Ballers, Heads Up, and Mahjong Solitaire. However, it’s unclear if and when Netflix plans to roll out game handles to more of its games.

Netflix first launched games last November, and they haven’t exactly taken off. A recent report cites data from app tracking group Apptopia, which reveals that a measly one percent of Netflix subscribers, or about 1.7 million users, interact with Netflix’s games daily.

Netflix aims to include 50 games in its library by the end of 2022 and just added Heads Up!, a game popularized by the Ellen Degeneres show. In addition to a new ad-supported tier and a potential password-sharing crackdown, Netflix’s games could assume an even more significant role as the company scrambles to get its wavering subscriber count back on an upward trend.

In Netflix’s most current earnings report, the streaming service reported failing subscribers for the first time in over a decade, while Disney Plus contained to add 7.9 million new users in the first quarter of 2022. In addition, Netflix has hinted at potentially cracking down on password sharing and adding a cheaper ad-supported streaming option to support the form and counter a dip in revenue and subscribers.

Netflix can be accessed via the internet browser on computers or thru application software installed on smart TVs, set-top boxes linked to televisions, tablet computers, Blu-ray Disc players, smartphones, digital media players,  virtual reality headsets, and video games consoles,  on the list of Netflix-compatible gadgets. It is available in 4K resolution. In the United States, the company delivers DVD, and Blu-ray rentals delivered individually through the United States Postal Service from local warehouses.

Netflix was founded on the previous date by Reed Hastings and Marc Randolph in Scotts Valley, California. Netflix initially sold and rented DVDs by mail, but the sales were eliminated within a year to focus on the DVD rental business. In 2007, Netflix presented streaming media and video on demand.

The company extended to Canada in 2010, followed by Latin America and the Caribbean. Netflix joined the content-production industry in 2013, debuting its first series House of Cards. In January 2016, it expanded to an additional 130 countries and then operated in 190 countries.

As pointed out by Deadline, support for live streams could open up the potential for Netflix to air live reunions, like the one just held by the real estate reality show Selling Sunset, and enable live voting for competition concerts.

Netflix could also utilize the feature to air live comedy specials. This year, Netflix maintained its first-ever life, and in-person comedy festival, called the Netflix Is a Joke Fest. The Los Angeles-based event traversed several days and featured over 130 famous comedians, including Ali Wong, Bill Burr, Jerry Seinfeld, John Mulaney, etc.

Netflix is set to begin airing some of the shows it taped at the event this month and into June. Still, a live possibility could give users at home the ability to watch shows as they unfold (if Netflix chooses to bring the festival back next year).

So far, we don’t know considerably about the upcoming feature yet, and Netflix didn’t instantly respond to The Verge’s request for comment. However, Disney Plus, one of Netflix’s biggest rivals, has already gotten into live streams. In February, Disney Plus circulated a live showing of the Academy Awards, a foremost for the service. It has also evolved into the new home of the celebrity dance competition sequence, Dancing With the Stars, which will debut as a live series after this year.

In Netflix’s most current earnings report, the streaming service reported failing subscribers for the first time in over a decade, while Disney Plus contained to add 7.9 million new users in the first quarter of 2022. In addition, Netflix has hinted at potentially cracking down on password sharing and adding a cheaper ad-supported streaming option to support the form and counter a dip in revenue and subscribers.