DNS Server not Responding : How to Fix the Problem

DNS is a server that helps websites’ addresses to connect to them. If the addresses become outdated or there is server issues, definitely you will get DNS error and will be unable to connect.

You can fix DNS issues through troubleshooting current connection, flushing the DNS cache, disabling extra connections, changing computer’s default DNS server, or resetting router.

Let’s attempt to do some self-help in a step wise manner to fix DNS issues.

  • Troubleshooting
  • Flushing the DNS Cache
  • Disabling Extra Connections
  • Editing the DNS Server
  • Resetting the Router

Troubleshooting

  • Try connecting with a different device.e.g., a phone, tablet, or computer to the network and access the webpage, the issue is definitively with the device and not the router.
  • Not being able to connect with the second device doesn’t necessarily mean that the router is the problem.
  • If the issues are resolved, uninstalling and then reinstalling old browser will likely fix the problem.
  • Power cycle modem and router by doing the following steps:-
    1. Unplug modem’s power cable as well as router’s power cable.
    2. Allow both modem and router to sit for at least 30 seconds.
    3. Reconnect modem and wait for it to come back online.
    4. Reconnect router to modem and wait for it to come back online.
    5. Connect computer to router via Ethernet. Skip step, If already using Ethernet
  • If you can connect to a web page while using Ethernet, the problem may stem from router then it needs to be reset it.
  • If unable connect to a web page while connected via Ethernet, DNS settings may be the problem.

Flushing the DNS Cache

  • Windows
    1. Open Start. Click the Windows logo in the bottom-left corner of the screen, or press ⊞ Win.
    2. Type command prompt into Start.
    3. Click Command Prompt at the top of the Start window to open Command Prompt.
    4. Type in ipconfig /flushdns and press ↵ Enter to remove saved DNS addresses.
    5. Restart web browser to refresh browser’s cache.
    6. If there are still connection issues, go to the next method.
  • Mac
    1. Open Spotlight in the top-right corner of the screen or press ⌘ Command+Space to open Spotlight.
    2. Type terminal into Spotlight. Spotlight will begin searching for Terminal on your Mac.
    3. Click Terminalat the top of the Spotlight results.
    4. Type this command into Terminal:
      • sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder
      • and press ⏎ Return to restart the macOS DNS process.
      • You may have to enter administrator password.
    5. Restart web browser to refresh browser’s cache.
    6. If there are still connection issues, go to the next method.

Disabling Extra Connections

  • Open your computer’s Network Settings.
  • On Windows
    • Open Start
    • click Settings
    • click Network & Internet
    • click Change adapter options.
  • On Mac
    • Open the Apple menu
    • Click System Preferences
    • Click Network.
  • Look for extra connections and remove any connection to which you aren’t currently connected including Bluetooth & wireless connections.
  • The most common cause for DNS issues is the existence of “Microsoft Virtual WiFi Miniport Adapter”.
    • Select an extra connection.
    • Simply click a connection to select it.
      1. On Windows, each icon on the page represents a connection.
      2. On Mac, the connections are on the left side of the window.
    • Remove the connection. To do so:
      1. Windows – Tap Disable network device at top of the window.
      2. Mac – Tap minus sign (-) at the bottom of the network window.
  • If you can access webpage, then the issue is resolved. If not, proceed to the next method.

Editing the DNS Server

  • Windows
    1. Tap and select the current connection’s name on the Connections page.
    2. Tap Change settings in the top row of options in the window to open the connection’s settings.
    3. Press and select the “Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)” result in the window in the middle of the Wi-Fi Properties pop-up.
    4. If unable to see the window, Tap Networking tab at the top of Wi-Fi Properties.
      • Click Properties is near the bottom of the window.
      • Check the “Use the following DNS server addresses” circle near the bottom of the Properties window.
      • Enter a preferred DNS address in the “Preferred DNS server” field near the bottom of the window. Reliable DNS servers include the following:
        1. OpenDNS – Enter 208.67.222.222.
        2. Google – Enter 8.8.8.8.
    5. Enter an alternate DNS address in the “Alternate DNS server” field below the first field. Depending on what you entered in the “Preferred” field, what you enter here will vary:
      • OpenDNS – Enter 208.67.220.220.
      • Google – Enter 8.8.4.4.
    6. Click OK to save DNS settings.
    7. Click Close at the bottom of the window.
    8. Restart computer after booting up. Test network connection. If it starts working now, computer’s default DNS server was a problem.
    9. If the computer can connect call Internet Service Provider to notify them about the DNS issues.
    10. If you still can’t connect, proceed to the next method.
  • Mac
    1. Open the Apple menu in the top-left corner of the screen.
    2. Press System Preferences near the top of the Apple drop-down menu.
    3. Press Network which is globe-shaped icon is in the System Preferences window.
    4. Tap current Wi-Fi network in the pane on the left side of the window.
    5. Tap Advanced near the middle of the window.
    6. Tap DNS tab at the top of the window.
    7. Click +. This option is below the DNS Servers window.
    8. Enter a DNS server address. OpenDNS and Google both have reliable, quick DNS servers:
      • Google – 8.8.8.8 or 8.8.4.4.
      • OpenDNS – 208.67.222.222 or 208.67.220.220
    9. Click the Hardware tab on the far-right side of the tabs at the top of the window.
    10. Click the “Configure” box, then click Manually near the top of the Hardware page.
    11. Press the “MTU” box below the “Configure” box then click Custom.
    12. Type 1453 into the text field below the “MTU” box.
    13. Press OK at the bottom of the page.
    14. Tap Apply at the bottom of the page saves settings and applies them to current Wi-Fi network.
    15. Restart computer. Once boots up, test network connection; if it works now, then computer’s default DNS server was the problem.
    16. If computer can connect, consider calling Internet Service Provider to notify them about the DNS issues.
    17. If still unable to connect, proceed to the next method.
Hourglass on laptop computer concept for time management

Resetting the Router

  • Find router’s “Reset” button usually on the back of the router.
  • Usually, it requires a needle, a paperclip, or a similarly thin item to press the “Reset” button.
  • Resetting router will also disconnect every device that was connected to the router.
  • tap and hold the “Reset” button for at least 30 seconds to ensure that the router completely resets.
  • Connect to network using the factory password on the bottom of router.
  • Try accessing the website you were having trouble with. If unable to connect to the Internet, contact Internet Service Provider to report the issue.
  • If resetting the router resolve the DNS issues, consider buying a new router if yours is old.
2 Comments
  1. Shannon says

    Good luck, hope this review helps you in your decision.

  2. Eloy says

    Seems fine.

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