Top 10 Technology Stories of the Week – March 17th to March 24th 2012

Top 10 Technology Stories of the Week – March 17th to March 24th 2012
MEditor   May 29, 2016 Others

Facebook says it may sue employers…, Judge rules that Kim Dotcom’s cash…, Parts of US law that engineers…, Megaupload Seizure Order…, The Pirate Bay – LOSS…, Secret Anti-Piracy Negotiations…, sign a petition calling…, Free apps eat up your phone battery…, cashless society…, “graduated response” program…

1. Facebook says it may sue employers who demand job applicants’ passwords

Facebook has taken a stand against what it calls a “distressing increase” in reports of employers demanding the Facebook passwords of employees and job applicants. One such report came from the Associated Press this week, which detailed cases of interviewers asking applicants for Facebook usernames and passwords, a clear invasion of privacy if we’ve ever heard of one.

2. Judge rules that Kim Dotcom’s cash, cars and property were seized using a court order which should never have been granted.

Internet tycoon Kim Dotcom’s cash, cars and property were seized using a court order which should never have been granted. A judgment from Justice Judith Potter on Friday declared the restraining order “null and void” and having “no legal effect”.

Kim Dotcom. Photo / Brett Phibbs

3. Parts of US law that engineers need to know in order to do their jobs are secret – you are only allowed to read them if you pay thousands of dollars for the right to find out what the law of the land is.

This morning, I found a an enormous, 30Lb box waiting for me at my post-office box. Affixed to it was a sticker warning me that by accepting this box into my possession, I was making myself liable for nearly $11 million in damages.

An Imposing Eagle

4. Megaupload Seizure Order “Null and Void” Says High Court

Just when it seemed that the handling of the Megaupload case couldn’t get any more controversial, a development from New Zealand has taken things to the next level.

5. The Pirate Bay – LOSS

The development of GPS controlled drones, far-reaching cheap radio equipment and tiny new computers like the Raspberry Pi, we’re going to experiment with sending out some small drones that will float some kilometers up in the air. This way our machines will have to be shut down with aeroplanes in order to shut down the system. A real act of war.

6. Austrailian Gov’t: Not In The Public Interest For The Public To Be Interested In Secret Anti-Piracy Negotiations

Last month Techdirt wrote about yet more secret meetings between the copyright and internet industries, this time in Australia, where the federal government there was “encouraging” them to come up with ways of tackling online copyright infringement.

7. UK residents: please sign a petition calling for Alan Turing to be on new £10 notes

Alan Turing is a national hero. His contribution to computer science, and hence to the life of the nation and the world, is incalculable. The ripple-effect of his theories on modern life continues to grow, and may never stop.

8. Free apps eat up your phone battery just sending ads

STRUGGLING to make your smartphone battery last the whole day? Paying for your apps might help. Up to 75 per cent of the energy used by free versions of Android apps is spent serving up ads or tracking and uploading user data: running just one app could drain your battery in around 90 minutes.

9. A cashless society would be a bad thing because everything would be traceable and you wouldn’t buy things that were controversial, according to Peter Sunde, founder of the Pirate Bay and micropayment service Flattr.

A cashless society would be a bad thing because everything would be traceable and you wouldn’t buy things that were controversial, according to Peter Sunde, founder of the Pirate Bay and micropayment service Flattr.

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 10. RIAA CEO confirmed that the country’s largest ISPs will voluntarily roll out by July 1 a “graduated response” program aimed at discouraging unauthorized downloading.

Last week, RIAA CEO Cary Sherman confirmed that the country’s largest ISPs will voluntarily roll out by July 1 a “graduated response” program aimed at discouraging unauthorized downloading. A Memorandum of Understanding published last summer outlines the program, which was developed without user feedback.


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